• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
ФКН
Contacts

Moscow 119017 Russia

17/1 Malaya Ordynka Str.

Tel: +7 (495) 771-32-52

E-mail: weia@hse.ru

Administration
Academic Supervisor Sergey A. Karaganov
Deputy Dean (Academic Progress in Undergraduate and Master's Programmes) Igor G. Kovalev
Deputy Dean (Finance and Administration) Denis Medvedev
Deputy Dean for for Admissions and Alumni Relations Anna V. Zhikhareva
Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes
Bachelor’s programme

Asian and African Studies

5 years
Full-time programme
RUS+ENG
Instruction in Russian with some courses in English
Bachelor’s programme

International Bachelor's Programme in World Politics

4 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Bachelor’s programme

International Relations

4 years
Full-time programme
RUS+ENG
Instruction in Russian with some courses in English
Bachelor’s programme

World Economy

4 years
Full-time programme
RUS+ENG
Instruction in Russian with some courses in English
Bachelor’s programme

HSE University and Kyung Hee University Double Degree Programme in Economics and Politics in Asia

4 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Master’s programme

International Relations in Eurasia

2 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Master’s programme

International Relations: European and Asian Studies

2 years
Full-time programme
RUS+ENG
Instruction in Russian with some courses in English
Master’s programme

Master of International Business

2 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Master’s programme

World Economy

2 years
Full-time programme
RUS+ENG
Instruction in Russian with some courses in English
Master’s programme

HSE and Kyung Hee University Double Degree Programme in Economics, Politics, and Business in Asia

2 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Master’s programme

Socioeconomic and Political Development of Modern Asia

2 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Master’s programme

Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development

2 years
Full-time programme
ENG
Instruction in English
Article
Afghanistan's Political Future and its Role in Eurasian Cooperation

Safranchuk I.

India Quarterly. 2019. Vol. Vol. 75. No. Issue 1. P. 15-28.

Article
A New World Order. A View from Russia

Karaganov S. A., Suslov D.

Horizons. 2019. No. 13. P. 72-93.

Book
After the Storm: Post-Pandemic Trends in the Southern Mediterranean. ISPI – RIAC

Chuprygin A., Kortunov A., Abdel Pazek I. et al.

Ledizioni Ledi Publishing, 2020.

Article
Active Ageing Index in Russia - Identifying Determinants for Inequality

Varlamova M., Sinyavskaya Oxana.

Journal of Population Ageing. 2021. Vol. 14. No. 1. P. 69-90.

Book chapter
ASEAN in the “Brave Digital World”

Kanaev E., Simbolon L., Shaternikov P.

In bk.: Регионы в современном мире: глобализация и Азия. Зарубежное регионоведение. St. Petersburg: Aletheya, 2020. P. 57-66.

Professor Andrej Krickovic participated in the conference “Russia’s Power: Instruments and Dilemmas”

On November 29 Professor Andrej Krickovic participated in the conference “Russia’s Power: Instruments and Dilemmas” hosted by the French Institute of International Relations (IFRI) in Paris. 

In his presentation: “From Greater Europe to Greater Eurasia: Is Eurasian Integration Broken?” Professor Krickovic evaluated Russia’s led efforts at Eurasian integration and their prospects for the future. Though Eurasian Integration has been a moderate economic success it has failed to live up to the geopolitical expectations that Russia has placed on it. Initially it was hoped that Eurasian Integration would facilitate the creation of a Greater Europe from Dublin to Vladivostok (what analysts such as Richard Sakwa have called the “integration of integrations”). This plan fell through with the crisis in Ukraine and Russia’s subsequent estrangement from the West. Now the emphasis has shifted towards building a Greater Eurasia, which will not only integrate the countries of the former Soviet space but will also include China and other major Eurasian powers such as India, Turkey and Iran. The success of this ambitious and historically “game changing” project will depend on Russia and China’s ability to deepen and expand their economic relations, to manage their conflicts of interest in Central Asia, and to respond to non-conventional regional security challenges, as well as on the actions of smaller regional states -- whose room to maneuver and resist the dominance of great powers has increased in today’s complex interdependent world.