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Regular version of the site

Eurasian Online Seminar

The International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and the Department of International Relations of National Research University Higher School of Economics have launched a new Eurasian Online Seminar. We will be hosting outstanding speakers on international relations, world economy, and regional studies from various countries with some connection to the concept of Greater Eurasiaa huge area whose geopolitical importance is growing fast.

The First Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

The first seminar was conducted on Friday, April 10, 2020, by the patriarch of East Asian studies, Professor Ezra Vogel from Harvard University.

Ezra F. Vogel is the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences Emeritus at Harvard. Professor Vogel succeeded John Fairbank to become the second Director (1972-1977) of Harvard's East Asian Research Center and Chairman of the Council for East Asian Studies (1977-1980). He was Director of the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations at the Center for International Affairs (1980-1987) and, since 1987, Honorary Director. He was Director of the Fairbank Center (1995-1999) and the first Director of the Asia Center (1997-1999). He taught courses on communist Chinese society, Japanese society, and industrial East Asia. The Japanese edition of Professor Vogel's book Japan as Number One: Lessons for America (1979) remains the all-time best-seller in Japan of non-fiction by a Western author. He officially retired in 2000 but takes part in researches and East Asia related activities. His more recent influential books include Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China (2011) and China and Japan: Facing History (2019).

In his lecture, Professor Ezra Vogel described the main periods of cooperation between Japan and China after the end of World War II, and made a forecast regarding the further development of relations between the countries in the next decade.

The Second Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

On Friday, April 17, 2020, the second session of the “Eurasian Online Seminar” hosted a world-renowned scholar and expert on Russia and Eurasia, President of American University of Central Asia Dr Andrew Kuchins.

Andrew Kuchins received his M.A. (1985) and Ph.D. (1992) in Soviet Studies and International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and his B.A. magna cum laude in Russian Studies from Amherst College in 1981. Dr. Kuchins has held faculty, research, and administrative positions at the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford University, and the Johns Hopkins University (SAIS). Most recently, from 2015-2019, Dr. Kuchins was a Research Professor at Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service where he taught and ran the Russia Futures program. Before that he directed the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington DC (2007-2015) and directed the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, including running the Carnegie Moscow Center for three years, from 2000-2007. He has authored, edited, and co-authored seven books on the region, more than 150 book chapters, monographs, reports, journal articles, and op-eds on the region and is frequently called upon by global media, governments, and leading private sector companies and investors for consultation. His most recent article “What is Eurasia to Us (the U.S.)?” was published in a special issue of Strategic Analysis journal and then turned into a book chapter of The Roads and Belts of Eurasia edited in our Laboratory by its head Professor Alexander Lukin and published earlier this year by Palgrave Macmillan.

In his lecture titled “The US Approach to Eurasia” Andrew Kuchins described the U.S. policy in Eurasia from the collapse of the Soviet Union up to the present. In conclusion, the researcher assesses whether the United States achieved the geopolitical goals that it set in Eurasia.

The Third Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

On Friday, April 24, 2020, the third meeting of the Eurasian online seminar was held, at which a world-renowned expert on the Asia-Pacific regionalism, Professor Mark Beeson, spoke. The topic of the seminar was the rise of the Indo-Pacific and the strategic competition in Australia's region

Mark Beeson is the Professor of International Politics at the University of Western Australia. Before rejoining UWA at the beginning of 2015, he taught at Murdoch, Griffith, and Queensland universities in Australia, and the Universities of York and Birmingham in the UK. His work is centered on the politics, economics and security of the broadly conceived Asia-Pacific region. He is the author of more than 200 journal articles and book chapters, co-editor of Contemporary Politics, and the founding editor of Critical Studies of the Asia Pacific (Palgrave). Recent books and edited volumes include China's Regional Relations: Evolving Foreign Policy Dynamics (Lynne Rienner, 2014); Regionalism & Globalization in East Asia: Politics, Security & Economic Development (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014); Rivalry and Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific: The Dynamics of a Region in Transition, Volume 1 and 2 (World Scientific, 2019); Rethinking Global Governance ( Palgrave Macmillan, 2019); Environmental Populism: The Politics of Survival in the Anthropocene (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019).

In his speech, Professor Beeson focused on the development of Indo-Pacific strategic concept which replaced Australia’s foreign policy concept of the Asia-Pacific and described the main reasons behind such geopolitical shift. Professor Beeson also emphasized that the new concept will face a number of difficulties on the road to implementation, which include the uncertainty of the relations with the United States, possible contradictions between countries in the region, and the need for a more accurate conceptualization of the new concept.

The Fourth Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

On Thursday, April 30, 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations were proud to host one of the greatest living authorities in the field of international relations Professor Joseph Nye of Harvard University. He spoke about his new book Do Morals Matter? Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump and some implications for the current crisis.

Joseph S. Nye, Jr., is University Distinguished Service Professor and former Dean of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He received his bachelor's degree summa cum laude from Princeton University, studied at Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship, and earned a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard where he joined the faculty in 1964. In 2008, a poll of 2700 international relations scholars listed him as the most influential scholar on American foreign policy, and in 2011 Foreign Policy listed him among the 100 leading global thinkers.

From 1977-79, Professor Nye was a deputy Undersecretary of State and chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. In 1993-94 he chaired the National Intelligence Council which prepares intelligence estimates for the president, and in 1994-95 served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs.

Nye has published fourteen academic books, a novel, and more than 200 articles in professional and policy journals. His recent books include Soft Power, The Powers to Lead, The Future of Power, Is the American Century Over?, and Do Morals Matter? Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump.

He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the British Academy, the American Academy of Diplomacy, and an honorary fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. He is the recipient of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson Award, the Charles Merriam Award from the American Political Science Association, France’s Palmes Academiques, Japan's Order of the Rising Sun and various honorary degrees.

Professor Nye has made a significant contribution to IR theory. He is the co-founder, along with Robert Keohane, of the international relations theory of neoliberalism, developed in their 1977 book Power and Interdependence. Together with Keohane, he developed the concepts of asymmetrical and complex interdependence. They also explored transnational relations and world politics in an edited volume in the 1970s. In the late 1980s he coined the term soft power and it first came into widespread usage following a piece he wrote in Foreign Policy in 1990. More recently his notion of "smart power" ("the ability to combine hard and soft power into a successful strategy") became popular among both experts and politicians.

Joint Session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar with Dr Bates Gill

On Wednesday, 6 May 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies, Department of International Relations and the New Regionalism and the School of Oriental Studies of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar. Our speaker was a renowned expert on Chinese foreign policy Dr Bates Gill. The topic of his talk is “Wolf Warrior Diplomacy”: Is it Working for China?

Dr Bates Gill is the Professor of Asia-Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University in Sydney, and Senior Associate Fellow with the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) in London. He has a 30-year career as a scholar, policy advisor and author, focusing on Asia-Pacific politics, foreign policy and security, with a particular focus on China and U.S.-China relations.  An academically-trained and internationally-respected China specialist, he has led a global top-ten think tank and held academic and research positions at world-leading universities and public policy research institutions in the United States, Europe, and the Asia-Pacific in a 30-year international career.

Dr. Gill received his Ph.D. in Foreign Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson Department of Government and Foreign Affairs, University of Virginia.  He has previously held positions at the Australian National University and the University of Sydney (2012-2017). He was Director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) (2007-2012) and held the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C (2002-2007). He also served as a Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies and inaugural Director of the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution (1998-2002). Among his international honours, he holds the Royal Order of the Commander of the Polar Star and was named a top-ten American China expert by the Chinese Foreign Affairs University in 2015.

He has published eight books and over 200 other publications, including most recently, Rising Star: China’s New Security Diplomacy (Brookings Institution Press, 2007) and China Matters: Getting it Right for Australia (Black Inc/LaTrobe University Press, 2017) (with Linda Jakobson).  His current research projects include a focus on the modernisation of Chinese strategic forces (nuclear, cyber, space) and the fundamental drivers motivating PRC foreign policy under Xi Jinping.

The Sixth Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

On Thursday, 7 May 2020, The Department of International Relations and International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held the sixth session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our speaker was a renowned Singaporean diplomat and scholar Bilahari Kausikan. He spoke on South East Asia after the Pandemic.

Bilahari Kausikan is the Chairman of the Middle East Institute, an autonomous institute of the National University of Singapore. He was educated at Raffles Institution, the University of Singapore and Columbia University in New York. Mr Kausikan was Permanent Secretary of Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 2010 to 2013, having served as Second Permanent Secretary since 2001. He was subsequently Ambassador-at-Large until May 2018. His earlier appointments at the Ministry include Deputy Secretary for South-east Asia, Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York, and Ambassador to the Russian Federation. He is often referred to as "Singapore's undiplomatic diplomat" for his insightful and comments and analyses on Singaporean and world politics. He has been known in recent years for commenting extensively on Singapore's foreign affairs in newspaper articles, public lectures and social media. 

Mr Kausikan is the other of many articles and several books including: Dealing with an Ambiguous World (a collection of his lectures given in 2016) and Singapore is not an Island (2019).

The Seventh Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

On Friday, 8 May 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations of the National Research University Higher School of Economics were delighted to host a world-renowned authority on international relations Professor Barry Buzan. The topic of his talk was "Deparochialising IR: Benchmark Dates from a Global Military Perspective". 

Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at the LSE (formerly Montague Burton Professor); honorary professor at Copenhagen, Jilin, and China Foreign Affairs Universities; a Senior Fellow at LSE Ideas; and a Fellow of the British Academy. He took his first degree at the University of British Columbia (1968), and his doctorate at the London School of Economics (1973). From 1988 to 2002 he was Project Director at the Copenhagen Peace Research Institute (COPRI). From 1995 to 2002 he was research Professor of International Studies at the University of Westminster, and before that Professor of International Studies at the University of Warwick. He was Chairman of the British International Studies Association 1988-90, Vice-President of the (North American) International Studies Association 1993-4, and founding Secretary of the International Studies Coordinating Committee 1994-8. From 1999-2011 he was general coordinator of a project to reconvene the English school of International Relations, and from 2004-8 he was editor of the European Journal of International Relations.

Professor Buzan has made a significant contribution to IR theory. His thought has helped to shape International Security Studies since the 1980s, and the English School and International Historical Sociology since the 1990s. Being a leading figure of the Copenhagen school, he developed regional security complex theory, and helped to develop and promote Ole Wæver’s theory of securitization. He is considered to be a major figure in the English school of international relations theory, where he is identified with clarifying structural approaches to the study of international and world society.

Professor Buzan has written, co-authored or edited over twenty-five books, written or co-authored nearly one hundred and fifty articles and chapters, and lectured, broadcast or presented papers in over twenty countries. His more recent books include: An Introduction to the English School of International Relations: The Societal Approach (2014, with George Lawson), The Global Transformation: History, Modernity and the Making of International Relations (2015); Global International Society: A New Framework for Analysis (2018, with Laust Schouenborg); The Making of Global International Relations: Origins and Evolution of IR at its Centenary (2019, with Amitav Acharya) and Rethinking Sino-Japanese Alienation: History Problems and Historical Opportunities (2020, with Evelyn Goh).

Professor Buzan is currently working with Tarak Barkawi on a new IR periodisation from a global military history perspective. The point of his new paper is to question the standard, West-centric benchmark dates that are widely used to structure teaching and thinking about IR: 1648, 1815, 1919, 1945, 1989. These are all hinged around big wars centred on Europe, and take little or no account of the global South. The paper asks what sort of benchmark dates we would get, and why, if we took a perspective from global, rather than European, military history. The relevance of this is that we are rapidly moving out of the Western era in IR, and need to start thinking about how to periodise IR in terms relevant to global international society as a whole. Professor Buzan has agreed to present the preliminary results of this paper as a thought experiment.

The Joint Session of the Eurasian Online-Seminar and China Seminar with Yang Jiemian

On Tuesday, 12 May 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies, Department of International Relations and the New Regionalism and the School of Oriental Studies of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar. Our speaker was a renowned Chinese expert in international affairs Professor Yang Jiemian. The topic of his talk is "Post-Pandemic World Order and Major Power Relations".

Professor Yang is currently a Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Academic Affairs Council at Shanghai Institute for International Studies (SIIS) and a Counsellor of Shanghai Municipal People's Government. He received his B.A. from the Shanghai Normal University, M.A. from the Shanghai Institute for International Studies (SIIS) and another M.A. from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy and defended his Ph.D. at the Shanghai International Studies University. He later worked as SIIS Vice President and President.

Prof Yang also serves on the boards of the China National Association for International Studies, the Chinese People Institute of Foreign Affairs, the National Association of China-U.S. Friendship, the National Association of American Studies, Shanghai Association of International Relations, Shanghai Institute for International Strategic Studies, Shanghai Association of Taiwan Studies and many other organizations.

Dr. Yang is also a guest professor/fellow at the PLA National Defense University, Shanghai International Studies University and Tongji University. His honors include National Special Awards, Shanghai Outstanding Talent Award and several Shanghai Awards in Social Sciences. He has published numerous articles and books on international relations and American foreign policy. His most recent books include: International Systemin Transition and Multilateral Organization Developments (Beijing: Shishi Publishing House, 2007); Grand System: Toward Multi-Polar & Multi-Actor (Tianjin: Tianjing People's Publishing House, 2008); Global Climate Change Diplomacy and China’s Policy (Beijing: Shishi Publishing House, 2009); Poliferation of International Crisis and Sino-US Joint Response (Beijing: Shishi Publishing House, 2010); China’s Expo Diplomacy: Theory and Practice (Beijing: Shishi Publishing House, 2011)

The Ninth Session of the Eurasian Online Seminar

On Friday, May 15, 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism, Department of International Relations and the Master’s Program “Socioeconomic and Political Development of Modern Asia” were honored to host a distinguished US expert on international affairs and US-Russian relations Thomas Graham. The topic of his talk is “The Big Triangle China-Russia-US: Past, Present, and Future”.

Thomas Graham is a managing director at Kissinger Associates, Inc., where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs and a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He was Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007 and Director for Russian Affairs on that staff from 2002 to 2004. From 2001 to 2002, he served as the Associate Director of the Policy Planning Staff of the Department of State. From 1998 to 2001, Mr. Graham was a senior associate in the Russia/Eurasia program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. From 1984 to1998, he was a Foreign Service Officer. His assignments included two tours of duty at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, where he served as head of the political/internal unit and acting political counselor. Between tours in Moscow, he worked on Russian and Soviet affairs on the Policy Planning Staff of the Department of State and as a policy assistant in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy.

Graham is one of the founders and co-Directors of the Russian Studies Project at Yale University. He was a lecturer in global affairs and political science at Yale from 2011 to 2019, teaching courses on U.S.-Russian relations and Russian foreign policy, as well as cybersecurity and counterterrorism. He served as a Senior Fellow at Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs from 2011 – 2017. 

The Joint Session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar with Kishore Mahbubani

On Tuesday, 19 May 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations of the National Research University Higher School of Economics were delighted to host a distinguished Singaporean diplomat and academic Professor Kishore Mahbubani. The topic of his talk is "Has China Won?"

Professor Mahbubani is a Distinguished Fellow at the Asia Research Institute of National University of Singapore (NUS). He was with the Singapore Foreign Service for 33 years (1971-2004), where he served twice as Singapore’s Ambassador to the United Nations and held the position of President of the United Nations Security Council between January 2001 and May 2002. He was Permanent Secretary of the Foreign Ministry from 1993-1998. He was also the Founding Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy from 2004-2017. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of seven books, including Can Asians Think?, Beyond The Age of Innocence: Rebuilding Trust between America and the World, and The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East. His research interests are in the resurgence of Asia, ASEAN, public policies in Singapore, global geo-politics and global governance. His latest book on US-China relations entitled Has China Won? The Chinese Challenge to American Primacy was published in March 2020.

The Joint Session of the Eurasian Online-Seminar and China Seminar with James Steinberg

On Friday, 22 May 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and the Department of International Relations of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar. Our speaker was a distinguished American academic and political advisor Professor James Steinberg. The topic of his talk is "COVID-19: Point of No Return in Sino-US Relations?"

James B. Steinberg is University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs and Law at Syracuse University, where he was Dean of the Maxwell School from July 2011 until June 2016.

Mr. Steinberg received his A.B from Harvard College and a J.D. from Yale Law School. Prior to becoming Dean he served as Deputy Secretary of State, the principal deputy to Secretary Hillary Clinton, from 2009-2011. From 2005-2008, Steinberg was Dean of the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. From 2001 to 2005, Mr. Steinberg was vice president and director of Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution.

Mr. Steinberg was deputy national security advisor to President Clinton from 1996 to 2000. During that period he also served as the president’s personal representative to the 1998 and 1999 G-8 summits. Prior to becoming deputy national security advisor, Mr. Steinberg held positions as director of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, and as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Analysis in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research.

Steinberg’s most recent books are A Glass Half Full? Rebalance, Reassurance and Resolve and Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: US-China Relations in the 21st Century (both with Michael O’Hanlon). 

The Joint Session of 12th Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar with Odd Arne Westad

On Wednesday, 27 May 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and Department of International Relations and the New Regionalism of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China Seminar. Our speaker was a world-renowned historian and foreign policy expert Professor Odd Arne Westad. The topic of his talk is "The Sources of Chinese Conduct".

Professor Westad specializes in the Cold War and contemporary East Asian history. He is the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale University, where he teaches in the Yale History Department and in the Jackson Institute of Global Affairs. Previously, he held the S.T. Lee Chair of US-Asia Relations at Harvard University, teaching in the John F. Kennedy School of Government. Westad has also taught at London School of Economics, where he served as director of a foreign policy think tank LSE IDEAS. In the spring semester 2019 Westad was Boeing Company Chair in International Relations at Schwarzman College, Tsinghua University. He is also a Fellow of the British Academy.

Originally from Ålesund on the Norwegian coast, he studied history, philosophy, and modern languages in Oslo before doing a graduate degree in US/international history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Westad has published 16 books, most of which deal with twentieth century Asian and global history. His three key works include The Global Cold War, which argues for ways of understanding the Soviet-American conflict in light of late- and post-colonial change in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean; Restless Empire, which discusses broad trends in China’s international history since 1750; and The Cold War: A World History, which summarizes the origins, conduct, and results of the conflict on a global scale.

Professor Westad published an article “The Sources of Chinese Conduct: Are Washington and Beijing Fighting a New Cold War?” in the September/October 2019 issue of Foreign Affairs. The title is an obvious allusion to George Kennan’s article “The Sources of Soviet Conduct,” based on his famous “Long Telegram,” which was published in the same journal in 1947. Kennan’s thoughts had a great impact on the US policy during the Cold War, although Prof Westad seems to argue that Kennan was not understood well enough. Will Americans understand Prof Westad and China this time and are we looking into a new Cold War?

The 13th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Kevin Rudd

On Monday, 1 June 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations were delighted to host President of Asia Society Policy Institute and the 26th Prime Minister of Australia Mr. Kevin Rudd. The participants discussed the general topic of US-China rivalry and the future of the world order.

Kevin Rudd was born in Nambour, Queensland. He has a degree in Chinese studies from the Australian National University, and is fluent in Mandarin. Before entering politics, he worked as a diplomat, political staffer, and public servant.

Mr. Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute as its inaugural President in January 2015. He served as Australia's 26th Prime Minister from 2007 to 2010, then as Foreign Minister from 2010 to 2012, before returning as Prime Minister in 2013.

Mr. Rudd is Chair of the Board of the International Peace Institute, and Chair of Sanitation and Water for All. He is a Senior Fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, a Distinguished Fellow at Chatham House in London, a Distinguished Statesman with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Paulson Institute in Chicago. Mr. Rudd is a member of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization’s Group of Eminent Persons. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the Schwarzman Scholars program at Tsinghua University, and is an Honorary Professor at Peking University.

The 14th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Sergey Karaganov

On Thursday, June 4, 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations held the 14th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a leading Russian foreign policy analyst Sergey Karaganov. The topic of his talk is “The Military Underpinning of the Geopolitical Revolution”.

Sergey Karaganov is Dean of the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs at the National Research University Higher School of Economics and Honorary Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy. He is also Chairman of the Editorial Board of the Russia in Global Affairs journal, co-founder and former deputy director of the Institute of Europe of Russian Academy of Sciences. He authored more than 25 books and around 500 articles.

Professor Karaganov is a member of the Academic Council of the Russian Foreign Ministry, Member of the Academic and Advisory Council of the Russian Security Council, and Member of the Council for the Development of Civil Society and Human Rights under the President of Russia. In 1990s he was a member of the Presidential Council of Russia and in 2014-2015 - of the High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on European Security as a Common Project under the OSCE (2014–2015). In the 2005 Global Intellectuals Poll he was the only intellectual from the former Soviet Union and only one of four from Eastern Europe of 100 people listed.

The 15th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Thierry de Montbrial

On Wednesday, June 10, 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations of the National Research University Higher School of Economics were delighted to host a world-renowned French foreign policy thinker Thierry de Montbrial. The topic of his talk is “Has the virus changed the international system?”

Thierry de Montbrial is the Executive Chairman of the French Institute of International Relations (Institut français des relations internationales, Ifri) which he headed since 1979. In 2008, he launched the World Policy Conference.

Professor de Montbrial graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole des Mines, and received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. He was Professor at the Ecole Polytechnique since 1974 and chaired its Department of Economics between 1974 and 1992. He is Professor Emeritus at the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers. He was also the Chairman of the French-Austrian Center for European Economic Convergence (1985-2015).

Professor de Montbrial serves on the International Advisory Board of Lafarge and chairs the International Advisory Board of OCP Group (Morocco). He is on the Board of Directors of Renault Foundation. He sits on the editorial advisory board of Foreign Policy, Washington, the editorial board of Russia in Global Affairs, Moscow, and the editorial board of The South African Journal of International Affairs, Johannesburg. He is also a Visiting Professor at the China Foreign Affairs University, Beijing.

In June 1992, he was elected as a member of the Institut de France (Académie des Sciences Morales et Politiques) of which he was elected chairman for the year 2001. He is also a founding member of the Académie des Technologies. He is also a foreign member of a number academies including the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Professor de Montbrial is the author of many professional articles and of twenty books (several of them translated in various languages) in economics and international affairs.

The 16th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Ambassador Sujan R. Chinoy

On Tuesday, June 16, 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Department of International Relations of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held the 16th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. We were delighted to host a leading Indian foreign policy and security analyst Ambassador Sujan R. Chinoy. The topic of his talk is “The Changing Dynamics of the Indo-Pacific”.

Sujan R. Chinoy is the Director General of the Manohar Parrikar Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses, New Delhi, since 3 January 2019. A career diplomat of the Indian Foreign Service from 1981-2018, he was India’s Ambassador to Japan and the Republic of the Marshall Islands from 2015-2018, and earlier, the Ambassador to Mexico and High Commissioner to Belize.

A specialist with over 25 years of experience on China, East Asia and the Asia-Pacific, he served in Indian Missions in Hong Kong and Beijing and as Consul General in Shanghai and Sydney. He also served as India’s representative to the First Committee at the United Nations in New York dealing with Disarmament & International Security Affairs and in the Indian Mission in Riyadh. At Headquarters, in the Ministry of External Affairs, he served as Director (China) as well as Head of the Expert Group of Diplomatic & Military Officials tasked with CBMs and boundary-related issues with China.  He also served on the Americas Desk dealing with the USA and Canada, and as Officer on Special Duty in charge of press relations in the External Publicity Division. On deputation for four years with the National Security Council Secretariat under the Prime Minister’s Office, he worked on internal and external national security policy and anchored strategic dialogues with key interlocutors around the world.

He is fluent in English, Chinese (Mandarin) and conversant in French, Spanish, German, Japanese, Arabic, Urdu and French-Creole. He also speaks Hindi and Gujarati.

The 17th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Ambassador P.S.Raghavan

On Thursday, 25 June 2020, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and Department of International Relations and the New Regionalism of the National Research University Higher School of Economics held the 17th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a leading Indian diplomat and foreign policy analyst, Chairman of the National Security Advisory Board Ambassador P.S.Raghavan. The topic of his talk is “India and Russia in the Indo-Pacific.”

Ambassador Raghavan is Chairman of the National Security Advisory Board (NSAB), which advises India’s National Security Council on strategic and security issues.

In a diplomatic career of over 36 years, he has served as India’s Ambassador to Russia (2014-16), Czech Republic and Ireland.  He has also held other diplomatic positions in USSR, Poland, UK, Vietnam and South Africa.

He was Joint Secretary [Director General] in the Prime Minister's Office (2000-2004) dealing with foreign affairs, nuclear energy, space, defence and national security, during a period of transformation in India’s foreign and national security policies.

As Secretary [Deputy Foreign Minister] in the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA), he handled India’s external economic relations and oversaw Administration, Security and e-governance. He also headed the Development Partnership Administration, which coordinates India’s economic partnership programme in developing countries, with an annual budget of US $1-1.5 billion.

He was Chief Coordinator of the BRICS Summit in New Delhi (March 2012). From 2012 to January 2014, he was Special Envoy of Government of India to Sudan and South Sudan.

As Chairman NSAB, he engages with government departments and think tanks in India and outside on India’s strategic perspectives. He writes widely on these issues.

The 19th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Ambassador Kazuhiko Togo

On Monday, 28 September 2020, the Department of International Relations and the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism of National Research University Higher School of Economics held the 19th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a renowned Japanese diplomat and scholar Kazuhiko Togo. The topic of his talk is “Abe Shinzo: Political Legacy and the Agenda for Prime Minister Suga.”

Kazuhiko Togo (Ph.D. 2009, Leiden University) is a Visiting Professor at Kyoto Sangyo University and Advisor for External Relations for the Shizuoka Prefecture.

He graduated from Tokyo University, Faculty of International Relations in 1968 and served in the Japanese Foreign Ministry until 2002. Half of his career was devoted to Russia, including his positions as Director of the Soviet Union Division (1988-91), Director-General of Treaties Bureau (1998-99), Director-General of European Bureau (1999-2001), and three times services at the Japanese Embassy in Moscow altogether amounting to eight years and a half.

 Professor Togo’s last posting was Ambassador to the Netherlands (2001-02). Since then, he taught at universities abroad, including those in Leiden, Princeton, and Seoul National University GSIS before joining Kyoto Sangyo University in 2009, where he assumed the post of Professor and Director of the Institute for World Affairs, for 10 years.

His current research interests include (1) International politics and Japanese foreign-security policy in East Asia, (2) Territorial problems and historical memory in North-East Asia and (3) Identity and civilizational dialogue.

His recent publication in English includes “Japan's Foreign Policy 1945-2009(2010)”; “(co-editor) East Asia’s Haunted Present: Historical Memories and the Resurgence of Nationalism (2008)”; “(editor) Japan and Reconciliation in Post-war Asia: The Murayama Statement and its Implications (2013)”; “(co-editor) Building Confidence in East Asia: Maritime Conflicts, Interdependence and Asian Identity Thinking (2015)”. For other books and articles refer to http://kazuhiko-togo.com

The 20th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Dmitry Suslov

On Friday, November 6, 2020, the Department of International Relations and the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism of National Research University Higher School of Economics held the 20th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a leading Russian expert on the US and US-Russian relations Dmitry Suslov. The topic of his talk is “The US after the Presidential Elections 2020: Prospects for Foreign Policy and US-Russian Relations.”

Dmitry Suslov serves as Deputy Director of the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies and Senior Lecturer at the Department of International Relations at HSE University.  He regularly consults Russian government agencies and private companies on various international issues. He co-authored several books and policy papers, including The U.S. Policy in Asia Pacific, Non-Military Instruments of the Russian Foreign Policy: Regional and Global Mechanisms; Russia: a Strategy for the New World; Russia vs. Europe. Confrontation or Alliance?; Russia and the World: a New Epoch. He teaches courses in US Domestic and Foreign Policy, Introduction to International Relations, Global Governance, US-Russia Relations, and Russia-EU Relations at HSE University. He is frequently interviewed by leading Russian and foreign newspapers and invited as a guest to various TV programs to comment on international politics, American politics and US-Russian relations.

 

The Joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China seminar with Dr. Richard Weitz

On Friday, November 13, 2020, the Department of International Relations and the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism in cooperation with the School of Oriental Studies of National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China seminar. Our guest was a US expert on European, Eurasian and East Asian security Dr. Richard Weitz. The topic of his talk is “How Could the US Elections Impact Russian-Chinese-US Relations.”

Richard Weitz is Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at Hudson Institute. His current research includes regional security developments relating to Europe, Eurasia, and East Asia as well as U.S. foreign and defense policies. Before joining Hudson in 2005, Dr. Weitz worked for shorter terms for other research institutions and the U.S. Department of Defense, where he received an Award for Excellence from Office of the Secretary of Defense. Dr. Weitz is a graduate of Harvard University (Ph.D. in Political Science), Oxford University (M.Phil. in Politics), the London School of Economics (M.Sc. in International Relations), and Harvard College (B.A. with Highest Honors in Government), where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He is proficient in Russian, French, and German.

Dr. Weitz has authored or edited several books and monographs, including Assessing the Collective Security Treaty Organization (2018); Promoting U.S.-Indian Defense Cooperation (2017); Enhancing the Georgia-US Security Partnership (2016); Parsing Chinese-Russian Military Exercises (2015); China and Afghanistan After the NATO Withdrawal (2015); Reforming U.S. Export Controls Reforms (2015); Turkey's New Regional Security Role: Implications for the United States (2014); Rebuilding American Military Power in the Pacific (2013); Global Security Watch—China (2013); War and Governance: International Security in a Changing World Order (2011); The Russian Military Today and Tomorrow (2010); Global Security Watch—Russia (2009); China-Russia Security Relations (2008); Mismanaging Mayhem: How Washington Responds to Crisis (2008); The Reserve Policies of Nations (2007); and Revitalising U.S.–Russian Security Cooperation: Practical Measures (2005); and two volumes of National Security Case Studies (Project on National Security Reform, 2012 and 2008).

Dr. Weitz has also published in such journals as Survival, Jane’s Intelligence Review, Jane's Islamic Affairs Analyst, The Washington Quarterly, The National Interest, NATO Review, Global Asia, Arms Control Today, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Defense Concepts, Pacific Focus, Asan Forum, Journal of Defence Studies, Small Wars Journal, WMD Insights, Parameters: US Army War College Quarterly, Naval War College Review, World Affairs, China Brief, Political Science Quarterly, Journal of Strategic Studies, and Yale Journal of International Affairs.

The 22nd Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Professor Fedor Lukyanov

On Friday, November 27, 2020, the Department of International Relations and the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism of National Research University Higher School of Economics held the 22nd session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a renowned Russian expert on international relations Fedor Lukyanov. The topic of his talk is “Russia – EU: How we learned to stop worrying and love the split.

Fyodor Lukyanov is a world-renowned expert on Russian foreign policy and a famous journalist. He holds a degree in German Linguistics from Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Philology (1991). He currently serves as Research Professor at Higher School of Economics in Moscow and Editor of Russia in Global Affairs – one of Russia’s most influential IR journals. The aim of the journal is to provide a platform for Russian as well as international experts and politicians for discussing challenges facing the world nowadays. Mr. Lukyanov is also a Research Director at the Valdai International Discussion Club – a Russian think tank where President Putin often speaks – and Chairman of the Presidium of the Council for Foreign and Defense Policy – an influential Russian non-governmental public association. He is also a member of the Russian International Affairs Council.

Mr Lukyanov is a prolific writer. He is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on various aspects of international relations and Russia’s foreign policy. He is also a frequent guest of various TV and radio shows.

The Joint Session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China seminar with Professor David Shambaugh

On Tuesday, December 15, 2020, the Department of International Relations and the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism in cooperation with the School of Oriental Studies of National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China seminar. Our guest was a renowned US expert on China Professor David Shambaugh. The topic of his talk is “Future Challenges for China's Role in the World.”

Professor Shambaugh is an internationally recognized authority and award-winning author on contemporary China and the international relations of Asia. He currently is the Gaston Sigur Professor of Asian Studies, Political Science & International Affairs, and the founding Director of the China Policy Program in the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. He was also a formerly a Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at The Brookings Institution and Director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He also worked in the U.S. Department of State and National Security Council. He has served on the Board of Directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations, U.S. Asia-Pacific Council, and other public policy and scholarly organizations. Before joining the GW faculty Professor Shambaugh was Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and Reader in Chinese Politics at the University of London’s School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS) from 1986-1996, where he also served as Editor of The China Quarterly.

Professor Shambaugh has been selected for numerous awards and grants. An active public intellectual and frequent commentator in the international media, he serves on numerous editorial boards, and has been a consultant to governments, research institutions, foundations, universities, corporations, banks, and investment funds. 

As an author, Professor Shambaugh has published more than 30 books, including most recently Where Great Powers Meet: America & China in Southeast Asia and China & the World (both 2020), China’s Future and The China Reader: Rising Power (both 2016). China’s Future was selected by The Economist first on the list of “Best Books of the Year.” His China Goes Global: The Partial Power (2013) was selected by The Economist, Foreign Affairs, and Bloomberg News as one of the “Best Books of the Year” and was runner-up for the Asia Society Bernard Schwartz Prize. Other books include Tangled Titans: The United States and China (2012, selected by Choice as a “Best Academic Book of the Year”); Charting China’s Future: Domestic & International Challenges (2011); China’s Communist Party: Atrophy & Adaptation (2008); and International Relations of Asia (2008, 2014); Power Shift: China & Asia’s New Dynamics (2005). He has also authored more than 20 reports, 200 scholarly articles and chapters, more than 150 newspaper op-eds, and more than 50 book reviews.

The Joint Session of Eurasian Online Seminar and China seminar with Professor Charles Ziegler

On Tuesday, December 22, 2020, the Department of International Relations and the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism in cooperation with the School of Oriental Studies of National Research University Higher School of Economics held a joint session of the 24th Eurasian Online Seminar and China seminar. Our guest was a renowned US expert on International Relations in Eurasia Professor Charles Ziegler. The topic of his talk is “US reactions to the China-Russia partnership.”

Charles E. Ziegler is Professor and University Scholar at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. He is also Director of Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Professor Ziegler received his Ph.D in Political Science from University of Illinois. He worked as a Senior Fulbright Scholar at the Department of Political Science and Diplomacy at Pusan National University in Republic of Korea and a Research Associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London. He was also a National Fellow at Hoover Institution of Stanford University. His major teaching and research interests are International Relations, Foreign Policy, Comparative Politics, Security, Russian Foreign Policy and Domestic Politics, East Asia, Central Asia, and Democratization in Asia. 

Professor Ziegler has authored and edited several books as well as numerous articles in top academic journals. His most recent books include Civil Society and Politics in Central Asia, (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2015); The History of Russia, revised and expanded edition (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2009); The Russian Far East: A Region at Risk (with Judith Thornton) (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002).

The 25th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Professor Nobuo Shimotomai

On Thursday, March 4, 2021, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and the Department of International Relations of National Research University Higher School of Economics held the 25th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a renowned Japanese expert on International Relations, Russian and CIS politics and history Professor Nobuo Shimotomai. The topic of his talk was “Japan and the Origins of the Cold War”.

Nobuo Shimotomai is Professor Emeritus at the Faculty of Law and Politics at Hosei University in Tokyo and a Specially invited professor at Kanagawa University. Professor Shimotomai was born in Sapporo in 1948. In 1971 he graduated from the Faculty of Law of the University of Tokyo and in 1978 received his Legum Doctor (LL.D.) from the same faculty. He taught at Seikei and Tokyo Universities and did research in Moscow and the UK (University of Birmingham). From 1988 until 2019 he was professor at Hosei University. In 1992-1994 he was a Visiting Fellow at Russian Research Center (currently Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies) at Harvard University and The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. In 1998-2001 he was Associate Writer at Asahi Shimbun. In 2002-2004 he served as President of the Japanese Association of the International Relations, and in 2005 – Vice President of Asian Political Science Association.

Professor Shimotomai has authored about 30 books and more than 100 articles and monographs. His major publications include: Soviet Politics and Trade Unions: A Political History of the NEP (Tokyo University Press, 1982); Gendai Soren Seiji [Contemporary Soviet Politics in Japanese] (Tokyo University Press, 1987); Moscow under Stalinist Rule 1931-34 (Macmillan, 1991);  Tou ga syoyuusita kokka [The state owned by the party (Kodansya, 2002); Moskva i Kim Il Sung (Iwanami, 2006; Russian version from MGIMO, 2009); A.Torkunov, Iokibe, Streltsov, and Shimotomai, A History of Russo-Japanese Relations (Brill, 2019). 

The 26th Session of Eurasian Online Seminar with Ivan Krastev

On Tuesday, March 23, 2021, the Department of International Relations, the International Laboratory on World Order Studies and the New Regionalism and Bulgarian Club of National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE University) held the 26th session of Eurasian Online Seminar. Our guest was a renowned political analyst Ivan Krastev. The topic of his talk was “Is it tomorrow yet? How the pandemic is changing Europe”.

Ivan Krastev is the chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Bulgaria, and permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna, Austria. He is a founding board member of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Board of Trustees of The International Crisis Group and is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

Mr Krastev is a member of the global advisory board of Open Society Foundations, New York, and a member of the advisory council of the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) and the European Cultural Foundation (ECF). He is also associate editor of Europe’s World and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Democracy and Transit – Europäische Revue. From 2004 to 2006 he was the executive director of the International Commission on the Balkans chaired by the former Italian Prime Minister Giuliano Amato. He was the editor-in-chief of the Bulgarian Edition of Foreign Policy and was a member of the Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London (2005-2011).  He has held fellowships at St. Antony’s College (Oxford); the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars (Washington, D.C.); the Collegium Budapest; the Wissenschaftskolleg (Berlin); the Institute of Federalism at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland); and the Remarque Institute at New York University.

Mr Krastev is the author of Is it tomorrow, yet? How the Pandemic Changes Europe (Penguin, October 2020); The Light that Failed: A Reckoning (Allen Lane, 2019), co-authored with Stephen Holmes - won the 30th Annual Lionel Gelber Prize; After Europe (UPenn Press, 2017); Democracy Disrupted. The Global Politics on Protest (UPenn Press, 2014) and In Mistrust We Trust: Can Democracy Survive When We Don't Trust Our Leaders? (TED Books, 2013). Ivan Krastev is the winner of the Jean Améry Prize for European Essay Writing 2020.


 

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