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Article
Afghanistan's Political Future and its Role in Eurasian Cooperation

Safranchuk I.

India Quarterly. 2019. Vol. Vol. 75. No. Issue 1. P. 15-28.

Article
A New World Order. A View from Russia

Karaganov S. A., Suslov D.

Horizons. 2019. No. 13. P. 72-93.

Book
After the Storm: Post-Pandemic Trends in the Southern Mediterranean. ISPI – RIAC

Chuprygin A., Kortunov A., Abdel Pazek I. et al.

Ledizioni Ledi Publishing, 2020.

Article
Active Ageing Index in Russia - Identifying Determinants for Inequality

Varlamova M., Sinyavskaya Oxana.

Journal of Population Ageing. 2021. Vol. 14. No. 1. P. 69-90.

Book chapter
ASEAN in the “Brave Digital World”

Kanaev E., Simbolon L., Shaternikov P.

In bk.: Регионы в современном мире: глобализация и Азия. Зарубежное регионоведение. St. Petersburg: Aletheya, 2020. P. 57-66.

Tag "Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS)" – News

Why U.S. – Russia Relations Failed: An Analysis of Competing National Security Narratives - new article by L.M. Sokolshchik

Why U.S. – Russia Relations Failed: An Analysis of Competing National Security Narratives - new article by L.M. Sokolshchik
Lev Sokolshchik, an associate professor of the School of International Regional Studies and research fellow of the Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS), has published an article in the Russian Politics journal.

Year One of the Biden Administration: U.S. Foreign Policy Towards Russia - new article by L.M. Sokolshchik

Year One of the Biden Administration: U.S. Foreign Policy Towards Russia - new article by L.M. Sokolshchik
Lev Sokolshchik, an associate professor of the School of International Regional Studies and research fellow of the Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS), has published an article in the Journal of Eurasian Studies. The paper addresses the following key issues:
- How has Russia’s place in U.S. foreign policy changed under the Biden administration?
- What factors have contributed to increased confrontation between the United States and Russia under the Biden administration?
- What factors limited U.S. foreign policy ambitions towards Russia, as well as any negotiation opportunities?
- Where was cooperation possible between the United States and Russia, and where were disputes inevitable?

Lev Sokolshchik took part in the second Boot Camp of the ACONA project (2022/23)

Lev Sokolshchik took part in the second Boot Camp of the ACONA project (2022/23)
Lev Sokolshchik, an associate professor of the School of International Regional Studies and research fellow of the Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS), as an invited expert and advisor of the international research group participated in the Boot Camp of the Arms Control Negotiations Academy (ACONA). The event held from January 09 to 13 in the online format. 

V. Kashin and L. Sokolshchik took part in the first scientific and educational camp of ACONA 2022/23 academic year

V. Kashin and L. Sokolshchik took part in the first scientific and educational camp of ACONA 2022/23 academic year
Director of CCEIS V. Kashin as a speaker and associate professor of the Department of Foreign Regional Studies, researcher of CCEIS L. Sokolshchik, as an invited expert, took part in the first scientific and educational camp of the Academy of Arms Control Negotiations (ACONA), which was held from August 15 to 19 in an online format. The start of a new cycle of the project was preceded by a lot of preparatory work. For almost three months in the weekly mode L. Sokolshchik together with colleagues from MGIMO, Harvard University, the Woodrow Wilson Center, the Frankfurt Peace Institute, and the University of Iceland, participated in the formation of the program and the content of the camp events. During the camp, discussions, master classes and speeches by leading world experts in the field of strategic stability and global security, trainings on conducting international negotiations and resolving the most pressing issues of modern international relations were organized for project participants from the USA, Russia, Europe, Asia during the camp.

«Russian Gas Exports to Europe: In the Eye of the Storm» - the new article by V. Ermakov for the Valdai Club

«Russian Gas Exports to Europe: In the Eye of the Storm» - the new article by V. Ermakov for the Valdai Club
V. Yermakov, an expert at CCEIS, wrote an article for the Valdai International Discussion Club on Russian gas supplies to Europe amid the crisis. Key ideas: 
• Despite the fighting in Ukraine and an avalanche of Western sanctions, Russia continues to supply gas to Europe without interruptions;
• After a decline in January, gas supplies to Europe from Russia returned to their previous level in February and even increased in the first ten days of March;
• Gas transit through Ukraine was not disrupted even by fightings;• Over the past two years, the European gas market has gone from a supply surplus to a crisis caused by supply constraints (exacerbated by events in Ukraine), driving up prices;
• For over 50 years, Russia-Europe gas relationship has been underpinned by the concept of cooperatively managed interdependence producing mutual benefits, but it cannot remain immune to the increasing geopolitical animosity between the great powers and the emergence of extreme bargaining positions; 
• Gazprom's existing production capacity is sufficient to meet the company's obligations under long-term export contracts and cover seasonal peak in domestic demand, but investment in new capacity is required to meet additional new demand;
• Prior to the start of the special operation, Gazprom took a wait-and-see attitude, making it clear that without guarantees of demand there would be no major investments;
• There is a reorientation of gas supplies to Asian markets, and the launch of a special operation reinforces the need for a “pivot to the East”

Vitaly Yermakov discusses Russia’s Arctic strategy and the Northern Sea Route in a podcast with the The Straits Times (11.02.2022)

Vitaly Yermakov discusses Russia’s Arctic strategy and the Northern Sea Route in a podcast with the The Straits Times (11.02.2022)
Key points:  
1. Russia considers the NSR a strategic economic priority since it is instrumental for suppling Russian northern territories. Its importance has grown in the past few years with the expansion of Russia’s oil and gas projects in the Arctic. The NSR allows to monetize vast oil and gas resources located near the coastline and transport them economically to target markets. 
2. The realistic possibilities for the NSR to develop into a major trade artery to Asia. The NSR is an Arctic shortcut that saves time and reduces transportation costs on a route between Europe and Asia. But it is necessary to take into account that navigation in Arctic seas is still difficult and it could cause significant risks for ships. Russia is trying to increase its Arctic capabilities by building a new generation of powerful nuclear icebreakers and Arctic class ice-resistant tankers. Initially, Russian exports of oil, condensate, and LNG are going to represent the lion’s share of the transportation turnover via the NSR. When year-round navigation via the NSR becomes a reality, international transit might increase as well.  
3. The NSR and its geopolitical implications.  In a world of increasing global rivalries, Russia’s control over a major trade route connecting Europe and Asia is an asset. Unlike other marine routes to Asia that could be controlled by the US Navy, the NSR emerges as an important factor in the Russia-China relationship.

A. S. Pyatachkova commented to Bloomberg on the upcoming meeting between Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping (03.02.2022)

A. S. Pyatachkova commented to Bloomberg on the upcoming meeting between Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping (03.02.2022)
Deputy Head of the CCEIS Asia-Pacific Sector A. S. Pyatachkova commented in Bloomberg on the state of Russian-Chinese relations on the eve of the meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Key points:
- Cooperation between Moscow and Beijing is a strategic challenge for the Joe Biden administration;
-The aggravation of relations with the West encourages Russia to speed up cooperation with China, especially in the technological sphere, which is subject to sanctions pressure;
-Too much emphasis on economic relations with China could risk relegating Russia to the status of an energy and raw materials supplier to a much stronger partner;
-The imbalance of economic power could cause difficulties in bilateral relations if China refuses to perceive Russia as a partner with a special status and tries to put pressure on it.

Egor Prokhin presented a report at the International Conference "E-Education, E-business, E-Management, E-Learning" in Japan.

Egor Prokhin presented a report at the International Conference "E-Education, E-business, E-Management, E-Learning" in Japan.
Egor Prokhin, a research fellow of the CCEIS, presented a report titled “The role of technological platforms in the innovative development of Industrial enterprises" on January 17, at the 13th international conference "E-Education, E-business, E-Management, E-Learning", held at Waseda University in Tokyo.

Within the report’s framework, the results of the analysis of the experience of the main trends in the innovative development of industry in the Asia-Pacific countries were presented, and the economic and managerial effectiveness of new development models was assessed. 

«Pandemic Diplomacy: China’s Role in Central Asia in the Era of Covid-19» –Miras Zhiyenbayev for the Oxus Society for Central Asian Affairs.

«Pandemic Diplomacy: China’s Role in Central Asia in the Era of Covid-19» –Miras Zhiyenbayev for the Oxus Society for Central Asian Affairs.
Miras Zhiyenbayev, CCEIS Fellow, wrote an article on aspects of Chinese pandemic diplomacy and competition between Russia and China for influence in Central Asia for the Oxus Society for Central Asian Affairs. Key ideas:
- The global pandemic has exacerbated the economic and political problems of the Central Asia states. The situation in Central Asia provides opportunities for both China and Russia to consolidate their influence over the foreign and domestic policies of Central Asian countries.
- The economic strength of China provides the opportunity for China to use investments of private Chinese firms to establish cooperation with Central Asian governments through international organizations such as the SCO.
- Another opportunity afforded to China is the shift towards internal aspects of the national security caused by the pandemic. Some Central Asian governments are interested in Chinese surveillance technologies. The CA countries will have to continue to buy from China, without the ability to control their own technologies and develop their own rules.
- While the prospects of the economic dependence of CA countries from China are becoming ever more real, the existing cultural tensions will be the source of social instability. Russia still exerts huge amount of “soft power”, which allows to Russian government to use media to denigrate China’s activities in the region.

HSE University, Harvard University, and other partner organizations have completed the Second Boot Camp of the Arms Control Negotiation Academy (ACONA)

HSE University, Harvard University, and other partner organizations have completed the Second Boot Camp of the Arms Control Negotiation Academy (ACONA)
Lev Sokolshchik, an Associate Professor of the School of International Regional Studies, and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS) took part in the second ACONA Boot Camp (January 10-14, 2022) as a member of the organizing team and a supervisor of the international research group focused on the prospects for concluding a new arms control treaty. The activities at the camp included a series of presentations of the scientific projects' results of the ACONA fellows, discussions with the world’s leading experts in the fields of international relations and arms control, master classes, and exercises to develop negotiation skills.